Difference Between Quartz and Quartzite & Their Uses
Difference Between Quartz and Quartzite & Their Uses
Most people prefer marble or granite when installing or upgrading worktops in their house or place of business because of their classic natural stone elegance. However, quartz and quartzite countertops are becoming very popular premium surface options. If you are confused which one to choose between these two, continue reading to find out the difference between quartz and quartzite and their uses.

Most people prefer marble or granite when installing or upgrading worktops in their house or place of business because of their classic natural stone elegance. However, quartz and quartzite countertops are becoming very popular premium surface options. If you are confused which one to choose between these two, continue reading to find out the difference between quartz and quartzite and their uses. 

difference between quartz and quartzite

1. Structure

SiO2, the chemical formula for quartz, is made of silicon and oxygen atoms together. It is one of the most prevalent minerals on Earth and can be found in sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks. Quartz is a single mineral that can have a variety of hues, including smoky grey, pink, purple, and white, depending on the impurities present.

 

Sandstone undergoes metamorphism to become quartzite. Although quartz makes up the majority of its composition, it also includes feldspar, mica, and other impurities. The quartz grains are fused together throughout the metamorphic process by the extreme heat and pressure, resulting in a hard, thick rock.

2. Formation

Another difference between quartz and quartzite is the formation. Quartz is a naturally occurring mineral that is created by a number of different geological processes, including hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. It is made of ingredients like igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks and can be found in a variety of rock types.

 

Conversely, sandstone, a sedimentary rock made of quartz grains, can undergo metamorphism into quartzite when it is exposed to high heat and pressure. The quartz grains recrystallize and fuse together as a result of this process, creating a compact and dense rock.

3. Properties

With a Mohs hardness of 7, quartz is a durable mineral that is resistant to abrasion and scratches. It does not react with most substances due to its chemical inertness. Depending on the amount of impurities, quartz can be clear or translucent and has a vitreous (glass-like) sheen.

 

Quartzite has a Mohs hardness of seven to eight as it is a metamorphic rock, making it even harder than quartz. It has a high level of resistance against chemical attacks, abrasion, and scratches. The colours of quartzite can range from white to grey to pink to yellow, contingent upon the impurities that were present at the time of formation.

4. Application

If you want to know the difference between quartz and quartzite, application is a must know. Quartz is often used in the manufacturing of abrasives, glass, and ceramics. Quartz is also utilised in the electronics sector in the production of optical fibers and semiconductors. Quartz is also widely used in the jewellery business to make gemstones such as citrine, smokey quartz, and amethyst.

 

However, the main applications for quartzite are in architecture and building. Quartzite is a highly prized building material for countertops, flooring, cladding, and other interior and external uses because of its strength, resilience to weathering, and appealing appearance. Also, gardening and outdoor décor projects employ it.

5. Cost and Availability

Quartz is a reasonably priced and accessible mineral that is readily accessible and found in many places of the world. Quartz can cost different amounts, though, based on its quality, colour, and intended application.

Because quartzite is a metamorphic rock, it is less common than quartz and requires more involved extraction and processing techniques. Because of this, quartzite is typically more costly than quartz, especially when it comes to uncommon and premium color variants.

Different Uses 

Now that you know the difference between quartz and quartzite, let's check out the uses of two countertops. 

A. Uses of Quartz

1. Jewellery and Gemstones

Due to its durability and beauty, quartz is a popular gemstone material. A variety of quartz variants, including smoky quartz, citrine, and amethyst, are used extensively in the jewellery business because of their reasonably priced and eye-catching colours. 

2. Telecommunications and Electronics

Because of its remarkable piezoelectric qualities, quartz can produce an electric charge in response to mechanical stress or vice versa. Because of this special quality, quartz is a necessary component in the electronics and telecommunications sectors. 

3. Optics and Lasers

Quartz is a perfect material for use in optics and laser technology because of its optical transparency and minimal thermal expansion. Lenses, prisms, and other optical parts for telescopes, microscopes, and other scientific equipment are frequently made from quartz.

4. Building & Construction Materials

Quartz is often used as an aggregate in the building industry because of its hardness and resilience to weathering. An essential ingredient in the creation of mortar, concrete, and other building supplies is quartz sand.

B) Uses of Quartzite 

1. Surfaces and Countertops

Making surfaces and countertops for bathrooms, kitchens, and other interior areas is one of the most common uses for quartzite. Quartzite is a great material for various applications because of its remarkable hardness, stain and scratch resistance, and breathtaking natural beauty.

2. Flooring

Because of its strength and resistance to slippage, quartzite is a great material for flooring applications, both indoors and out. Both residential and commercial environments with heavy traffic, like lobbies, corridors, and commercial spaces, can use quartzite tiles or slabs.

3. Facades and Cladding

Due to its strength and resistance to weathering, quartzite is a commonly used material for facades and cladding in buildings and other architectural structures. Exterior walls can also be covered with quartzite tiles or panels.

4. Patio Sets and Garden Design

Because quartzite resists weathering and harsh outdoor conditions, it is a good material for projects including outdoor furniture and landscaping. Gardens, patios, and other outdoor living areas can benefit from the durable and organic touch that quartzite pavers, stairs, and seats can provide.

5. Decorative Accents

Quartzite is a popular material for decorative accents in both residential and commercial areas because of its distinctive colours, patterns, and textures. Quartzite is a beautiful material that may be used to make backsplashes, wall cladding, and fireplace surrounds.

Conclusion 

From the difference between quartz and quartzite, we can say that quartz is an excellent product that makes the ideal base for a stunning kitchen that will withstand years of regular use. Although quartzite can have a very lovely natural appearance, quartz is as beautiful, has a wider range of colour possibilities, and is more useful for usage in high-traffic areas.

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